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mini-castle

Ideally there'd be some rosemary bushes around it and when it rained the smell would be lovely.Thyme and Basil would be good too.

http://www.veranda.com/decorating-ideas/g1209/rural-romance/
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living room avec mirror

Ah the mirror and half circle arch windows.
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Radhuset Station, Stockholm on the Stockholm metro, organic architecture, bedrock exposed & unsculpted.
--John Evans
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Gate

Posted on FB - Avantgardens. The gate to the Endless Estate...
Photo: stevengreenbaum.photography
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A scandalous Art Nouveau collaboration that set Paris all atwitter at the turn of the century.





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Those who think that Hector Guimard was the only eccentric architect to produce Art Nouveau in the Parisian daily landscape will be left speechless by the 29 Avenue Rapp. Built in 1901 by Jules Lavirotte, this seven-story creation is probably the most extreme example of the ornamental delirium that is Nouveau that the French capital has hidden away. Lavirotte didn’t do it alone, but collaborated with his friends, the ceramist Alexandre Bigot, and other fellow sculptors to create this flamboyant and voluptuous façade, making them winners of the annual architectural frontage of Paris that same year.
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http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/holloways-roads-tunneled-into-the-earth-by-time?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=atlas-page

Holloways: Roads Tunneled into the Earth by Time
By Allison Meier

Sunken lane in Normandy, France (photograph by Jean-François Gornet/Flickr)

Appearing like trenches dragged into the earth, sunken lanes, also called hollow-ways or holloways, are centuries-old thoroughfares worn down by the traffic of time. They’re one of the few examples of human-made infrastructure still serving its original purpose, although many who walk through holloways don’t realize they’re retracing ancient steps.


Sunken lane in La Meauffe, France, site of a 1944 World War II battle (photograph by Romain Bréget/Wikimedia)

The name “holloway” is derived from “hola weg,” meaning sunken road in Old English. You’re most likely to discover a holloway where the ground and the stone below are soft, such as places rich in sandstone or chalk. No one ever engineered a holloway — erosion by human feet, and horses or cattle driven alongside, combined with water then flowing through the embankments like a gully, molded the land into a tunneled road. It’s hard to date them, but most are thought to go back to Roman times and the Iron Age, although in the Middle East some are believed to stretch back to ancient Mesopotamia. They even have their own ecology, such as the spreading bellflowers that enjoy the disturbed earth.

Read more... )
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Lake Michigan wave October 2015
on FB - David Ison

Kelpie?
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Inca Trail, Peru

house

Nov. 15th, 2016 03:13 pm
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Personally, there's not a lot of house to this one. It's narrow.
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Tell me that you don't see this as a elven tree home.

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