charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-21 11:35 am

Of course one meets at a club

Master list --- http://charisstoma.dreamwidth.org/1302810.html

Pumpernickel & Silas McKenny - cousin of Fern


The Club


Title: Of course one meets at a club
Follows from: Part 9 - Enter Silas & Part 10 - Pumpernickel
Author: charisstoma
Word count: 1378

He had no idea why he found himself in a bar. Perhaps like a bug, he’d been drawn to the golden lights, a thin smile curved his lips at his whimsy. ‘Hopefully there’s no bug zapper, though,’ he paused to consider, ‘ then again that might be interesting. Exciting anyway.’ A familiar tingling traveled up and down his spine, something he hadn’t felt in a while. Someone compatible, at least for now, available and interesting had set off his awareness-dar.

Casually Silas glanced around, scanning the others who’d also been attracted to the music, lights and potential hook ups. A hand smoothed over his ass, fingers tracing down the seam of his pants until they cupped up between his legs the center ones separating and supporting his ass and longer finger in the middle pressing up behind his balls. That definitely got his attention which hardened in interest. So demon… probably. Only a demon would be so capitably forward, and that middle finger was stroking back and forth where it was situated. There was no one physically there but … there was.
“Fucking ass demon.” Read more... )
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2017-09-20 08:08 pm

Quilt - Summer Camp

Log-cabin inspired Summer Camp Quilt





https://www.missouriquiltco.com/land/tutorials/summer-camp-quilt/assets/summer-camp.pdf

62" x 78" 6 blocks by 8 blocks

1 roll 2 1/2" strips
1 yd background fabric & includes inner border
3/4 yd complementary fabric
1 1/4 yd border fabric = 5 1/2" wide strip outer border
4 3/4 yd backing fabric

Sew 6 sets
10" squares of background and complementary fabrics
Draw lines from corner to corner in X pattern
Sew on either side of these lines.
Cut in half from center of side to other center of side.
Repeat this for the perpendicular sides.
Then cut on drawn lines from corners to corners.
= 8 half squares that are 4 1/2" X 4 1/2"
Square them up.

Sew a strip along side of half square that is colored, trim off excess. Short strip
Sew another strip along other of half square colored side. Long strip
Equals square.

Repeat this; short strip then long strip to form square with half square block in one corner.
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2017-09-20 07:40 pm

Spells of Magic

Title: Spells of Magic
Author: charisstoma
Word count: 193

Books surrounded her in neat piles, inside the ebook reader on the table beside her, and on the internet itself accessed through her laptop. All these stories, each begging to have their words read, to resonate inside her mind and each was more captivating than the last before being interrupted as another captured her attention in its turn. Yet still below the surface the unfinished stories tugged irritatingly for her to finish absorbing them.

“Tomorrow,” she told them, “tomorrow I’ll finish reading you. Really. I will.”

The television’s seductive song drew her attention. So many stories there too but more immediate, more important, for the feeling was if you missed even a moment it would be gone, its story unable to be recaptured.

A feeling welled inside, ‘I too have a story’ and her fingers moved over the keyboard; the letters appearing one by one, word by word upon the grey backed whiteness of the page. And for a while, all the other stories were pushed away as she created her own world and characters; her own story. It wasn’t real. But it was beautiful and it went where she guided it… usually.
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2017-09-20 01:06 pm

Book- A Wizard's Dozen

Excerpt from "A Wizard's Dozen: Stories of the Fantastic" edited by Michael Stearns

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51uuylmvGlL._SX340_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

wizard's dozen
1. any magical number from eleven to fifteen
2. the charmed numeral that gives a wizard's spell its power
3. the number of teachers at a wizards' school



What is a wizard?

A wizard is a mage, a wonder maker, a person who injects a jolt of the marvelous into the everyday. There are wizards everywhere, though these days they've traded in their magic shops and their spellbooks for libraries and storybooks. Today's wizards wield paintbrushes or pens or typewriters or computers instead of wands.

...Mage --- image --- imagination.
That is enough for any wizard.



..... Or is it?
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-19 10:42 am

Book - The Veil

book- the Veil

Object Lessons is a series of short, beautifully designed books about the hidden lives of ordinary things.

The veil can be an instrument of feminist empowerment, and veiled anonymity can confer power to women. Starting from her own marriage ceremony at which she first wore a full veil, Rafia Zakaria examines how veils do more than they get credit for.

Part memoir and part philosophical investigation, Veil questions that what is seen is always good and free, and that what is veiled can only signal servility and subterfuge. From personal encounters with the veil in France (where it is banned) to Iran (where it is compulsory), Zakaria shows how the garment's reputation as a pre-modern relic is fraught and up for grabs. The veil is an object in constant transformation, whose myriad meanings challenge the absolute truths of patriarchy.

Veil by Rafia Zakaria is a powerful meditation on the most visible emblem of the Islamic faith, its symbolic impact upon Muslims and non-Muslims and the controversy surrounding variations of the veil, including the headscarf, hijab and burqa.

Zakaria, a journalist and author (The Upstairs Wife), informs readers that "there are no verses in the Holy Quran that specifically prescribe the veil for women," and yet Muslim women who choose not to veil are often judged harshly by other Muslims. Zakaria herself is subjected to "moral disciplining" by male colleagues when she attends an academic conference in Egypt without a headscarf. She talks of the "fissure created by the veil," quoting female scholars who reject the male-centric interpretations of religious doctrine that have led to the elevation of veiling as a requirement.

If not compulsory within Islam, why do women wear the veil? Zakaria recounts her experience in a hospital waiting room in Pakistan. As an unveiled but modestly dressed woman, she was subjected to constant attention by men in the waiting room, as though her uncovered state entitled them to stare at her every movement. She envied a fully veiled woman in the same room who did as she pleased; talking loudly on the phone, she drew no attention at all. The veil grants anonymity, and anonymity is its own form of empowerment, transforming a public space like a waiting room into a place of privacy.

According to Zakaria, the Western media is too preoccupied with the veil as an obstacle to women's independence, the burqa being the "ultimate yardstick of female oppression." She urges the reader to consider a woman's choice--her right--to veil or not veil as far more relevant, since it is only when women are at liberty to make that choice that they will be free. --Shahina Piyarali, writer and reviewer
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2017-09-17 10:48 am

Doggerland

https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/09/02/britains-atlantis-the-lost-world-at-the-bottom-of-the-north-sea/

map DoggerlandMap showing hypothetical extent of Doggerland (c. 10,000 BC), which provided a land bridge between Great Britain and continental Europe Author Max Naylor CC BY-SA 3.0


map Doggerland2The red line marks Dogger Bank, which is most likely a moraine formed in the Pleistocene

To the pleasure of any modern-day mudlark, it has turned out that the shorelines of the Thames make for a remarkable archaeological site. In recent years, the mudlarks of London have reported finding all different kinds of memorabilia and historical items, from shards of Roman pottery to shoes made during the Tudor era.

The interest in the London mudlarks’ initiative has grown so much that a Facebook page dedicated to sharing found items from the Thames riverbed has hit nearly 30,000 followers. However, it is not only rivers that make for a great treasury of lost pieces of history. It is also sea beds; such is the case with the North Sea.Read more... )
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2017-09-16 05:44 pm

Lucid Dreaming

The Senoi people from the highlands of Malaysia were said to have power over their dreams
https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/09/04/the-senoi-people-from-the-highlands-of-malaysia-were-said-to-have-power-over-their-dreams/

The Senoi are a tribe that lives deep in the highlands of Malaysia and can be reached only by a helicopter or a boat. Along with the Negrito and Orang Malayu Asli, the Senoi are one of the three main Orang Asli groups, which are the oldest people of the region, the indigenous of Malaysia. Almost any written source about the tribe discusses the Senoi with dreams, so quite often they are mentioned as “the dream people.”

Every morning, a Senoi family would gather for breakfast and the children would start telling their dreams to the elders, and together they would analyze them. They didn’t have an established system of symbols according to which they would interpret the dream, but rather, they would analyze the plot and the story of the dream.

Their “dreaming rules” were very simple. First of all, children were taught to confront and conquer danger because in the dream it would most likely have a positive outcome. For example, if they dreamed of a dangerous animal, they were taught not to fear it but to confront it to see what would happen. If they needed help, the children should look for their dream friends rather than wake up.

If a child dreamed of falling down, the elders encouraged him to fall rather than escape from the dream. They taught the children to fall, knowing they wouldn’t be hurt, and to climb, to travel, or fly to unknown places, to unknown cultures, to learn new things. If they woke up instead, they would be advised not to escape from such dreams the next time they occurred.

During their teen years, the Senoi already had the practice of confronting any discomfort in their dreams, so dreaming for them was a process of learning. They were told they should always bring something back from their dreams to share with the group that listens to their dreams. If they fly, they should fly as far as possible and bring a song, a poem, or music from that place.

They were taught and encouraged to advance toward pleasure and so if they dreamed of making love with some dream lover, then they should go through an orgasm and ask for a “souvenir” from their lover, such as a sentence or a poem. Later, the whole experience would be discussed and analyzed in the group. Aside from individually, the Senoi grew collectively through their dreams and dreaming practice.

Also, if a dreamer dreamed that he had been mistreated by a friend in his dream, that friend should be notified so that they could repair their behavior next time. The whole group was concerned with individual dreams and they tried to improve their experiences and lives based on their dreaming. They exercised lucid dreaming as well as collective dreaming, and there is an account saying that they even built their houses in accordance to their dreams.

However, the claims about the controlled dreaming among the Senoi people were disputed after some academics who traveled to Malaysia to study them faced the disappointment of discovering that, although familiar with the concept of lucid dreaming, the Senoi didn’t remember any dreaming education within their group. Additionally, professors such as George William Domhoff claimed that the Senoi didn’t have such a culture of controlling their dreams.

Stewart wasn’t the only one who lived among the Senoi; there were many anthropologists after him. Whether they exaggerated the group’s concept of dreams and techniques of lucid dreaming or if the Senoi really were, in fact, as the Westerners described them, at least there is a story that keeps our faith in magic. Whether it is true or not, these dream practices do exist and they are said to have great health benefits for any individual or group who practice them.
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-14 07:36 pm

Meyer Lemon Bars

Meyer Lemon Bars


Meyer Lemon Bars
http://www.treats-sf.com/2011/02/meyer-lemon-bars_13.html

You don't have to use meyer lemons for this recipe but if you can find them you won't regret it. The sweetness of the meyer variety is a nice change from the lip-puckering tartness that you'd find with a regular lemon.

Most recipes have you pour a concoction of lemon juice, eggs and sugar over a warm, partially-baked crust. Easy enough - but the problem I find with this method is that the filling never seems to set properly even after the bars are baked and cooled. Try slicing nice even squares and you get sticky and gooey pieces. Not ideal. What I love about this recipe is that the filling is pre-cooked, like a curd, and when baked further in the oven its silky smooth texture holds its shape beautifully.

If you like citrus you can't go wrong with these meyer lemon bars.



Meyer Lemon Bars (adapted from Baking Illustrated)

CRUST
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup powdered sugar, plus more to sprinkle on the finished bars
pinch of salt
8 Tbls unsalted butter, still cool and cut into 8 pieces

FILLING
7 large egg yolks
2 large eggs
1 cup + 2 Tbls sugar
2/3 cup meyer lemon juice (from about 4-5 medium lemons)
finely grated zest from the lemons
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 Tbls unsalted butter, cut in to 4 pieces
3 Tbls heavy cream

For the crust
Cover a 9-inch square cake pan with two sheets of heavy duty aluminum foil, perpendicular to each other. Spray with nonstick cooking spray and set aside.

Put the flour, powdered sugar and salt in a food processor and process briefly, about 2 seconds. Add the butter pieces and process to blend, 8 to 10 seconds, then process until the mixture is pale yellow and resembles coarse meal, about three 1-second pulses. Sprinkle the mixture into the prepared cake pan and press firmly with your fingers into an even layer over the entire pan bottom. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake the crust until golden brown, about 25 minutes.

For the filling
In a medium saucepan whisk together the egg yolks and whole eggs until combined. Add the sugar, meyer lemon juice, zest and salt until well combined, about 30 seconds.

Add the butter pieces and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until the curd thickens to a thin sauce-like consistency (about 170 degrees on an instant-read thermometer), about 6 minutes.

Immediately pour the curd through a fine-mesh steel strainer set over a medium bowl. Stir in the heavy cream and then pour the curd into the warm crust.
Bake until the filling is shiny and opaque and the center 3 inches jiggle slightly when shaken, about 10 minutes. Cool on a wire rack to room temperature, about 45 minutes. Remove the bars from the pan and transfer to a cutting board. Cut into 2 inch squares, wiping the knife blade clean between cuts as necessary. Sieve powdered sugar over the bars, if you'd like.
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-12 08:19 pm

CrockPot Chicken Teriyaki

CrockPot Chicken Teriyaki
CrockPot Chicken Teriyaki
http://www.ayearofslowcooking.com/2008/04/crockpot-chicken-teriyaki-recipe.html

2 pounds chicken pieces
Frozen wings and drumettes.
If you don't want to mess around with bones, use chicken thighs.
Chicken breast just really doesn't have enough fat in it to hold up nicely in the slow cooker unless you decide to shred it completely.



Sauce:
if you have bottled teriyaki sauce, use about 3/4 of a cup, and then 2 tablespoons water in place of sauce.

OR

1/2 cup soy sauce (La Choy is gluten free, and so is Tamari Wheat Free)
3 tablepoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon cooking or regular sherry (I think tequila would work, too)
3 cloves smashed and chopped garlic

Directions

--plop your chicken in the crockpot
--cover it up with the sauce

cook on low for 6-8 hours, or on high for 4-5.

If you are using frozen pieces, it will take longer than if you are using thawed or fresh chicken.
Different pieces of chicken also have different density, and that will also effect cooking time. If you are going to be out of the house, cook on low.

You can always switch it to high later.

Serve over cooked rice.
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-12 11:50 am

Book title that isn't

book -educating elizabeth

No idea what the book is about... haven't looked. It's enough that at first glance I did a double take, 'surely the book isn't called Lubricating Elizabeth. Such is the way my mind works, I guess.
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-10 07:03 pm

Antelope skull

Interesting skull

http://www.harunyahya.com/image/Atlas_of_creation_v3/38_39_antelope_Skull.jpg

Now if anyone wanted to say that this was a demon's skull... not one of ours of course but still..... It has an oddly humanoid look for an antelope.
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-09 09:21 pm

Irish chain variations quilt

Irish chain variations quilt

4- half squares (background/medium color)

Arrange so medium color part of half squares are central and background is on outer = square on point enclosed in background color

Make 13
~~~~~~~~~

1- 4 patches (background/dark color A)
1- 4 patches (background/dark color B)
1- 4 patches (background/medium color A)
1- 4 patches (background/medium color B)


Arrange 4 --- 4 patches blocks
dark A and medium A
medium B and dark B

Make 12 & 6 partial 1/2 square of 4 patches
~~~~~~~~

Arrange
4- 4 patch block / half square blocks/ 4 -4 patch block/ half square block
half square blocks/ 4 -4 patch block/ half square block/ 4- 4 patch block
4- 4 patch block / half square blocks/ 4 -4 patch block/ half square block
half square blocks/ 4 -4 patch block/ half square block/ 4- 4 patch block
4- 4 patch block / half square blocks/ 4 -4 patch block/ half square block
half square blocks/ 4 -4 patch block/ half square block/ 4- 4 patch block
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-03 04:28 pm

Italian Easter Pie

Easter Pie
http://reciperoost.com/2017/02/22/even-though-not-yet-easter-italian-pie-can-star-day/2/

Italian Easter Pie

Our friend over at Bewitching Kitchen has this to say about the recipe:
“Each year I spot recipes for Easter Pie in websites and magazines, and I tell myself that I’ve got to see what it’s all about, but for one reason or another I never get around to making it. Still, the chances that this was the year to end my Easter Pie virginity were slim, because the thought of rolling dough in our nano-kitchen was downright scary. Yet, strange things happened. I read this post, and couldn’t stop thinking about it.”

I had a few problems with rolling the dough too even if I had a rolling pin at home. This recipe takes patience and determination. And you will find that it will all pay off in the end!

Read more... )
Italian Easter Pie2
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-02 08:46 pm

No-fail Pie Crust

No fail pie crust
http://easyrecipesly.com/ruths-grandmas-pie-crust/

Ruth’s Grandma’s Pie Crust

Ingredients

4 cups all-purpose flour
1 3/4 cups shortening
3 tablespoons white sugar
2 teaspoons salt

1 egg
1/2 cup water

Directions

In a large mixing bowl, combine all-purpose flour, shortening, sugar, and salt. Blend together with a pastry cutter until crumbly.

In a small bowl, mix egg with water. Blend into flour mixture. Chill in refrigerator until ready to use.
Source: allrecipes.com
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-02 08:23 pm

Nature as Art

Microscopic view of the foot of a beetle

Microscopic view of the foot of a beetle
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-09-01 05:05 pm

The World has taken a strange turn.

Woman pulls out gun in Walmart during row over last notebook
https://www.yahoo.com/news/woman-pulls-gun-walmart-during-151015240.html?soc_src=mail&soc_trk=ma

A woman is facing criminal charges after pulling a gun on two other women in a row over a school notebook.

The argument, captured on video filmed by a bystander, broke out between two pairs of women over the last notebook at a 'Back to School' sale at the Walmart in Detroit, Michigan.Read more... )

It is unclear who got the notebook.

~~~~~~~

Because of the Hurricane knocking out the oil refineries on the Texas gulf coast, someone put 2 and 2 together and started a gas panic.
Lines of cars at the stations and gas pumps going empty. It was bizarre.

One of the teachers said one man came in with garbage cans to fill up with gas. This is illegal of course. Gasoline containers have to conform to set requirements. Being colored red is one of those. They had to call the local police to come because he was forcefully determined to fill those containers up.

As it is, the stations are back up and running. They were replenished by the next day. The gas panic caused the shortage.

~~~~~~

Nurse screams for help as she is arrested for saying she can't draw blood from unconscious patient
https://www.yahoo.com/news/nurse-screams-help-she-arrested-093436094.html?soc_src=mail&soc_trk=ma

A nurse was allegedly assaulted and illegally arrested when she told a detective she could not take a blood sample from an unconscious patient.

Alex Wubbels told a police officer she could not take blood from the victim of a lorry crash because he could not consent, and the officer had produced no warrant.

Footage taken by University Hospital, in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Detective Jeff Payne's body camera show he threatened Ms Wubbels with jail if she did not comply, despite her having checked the policy with her bosses, the Salt Lake Tribune reported.Read more... )
charisstoma: (Default)
2017-08-31 03:27 pm
Entry tags:

Legal challenge to Arpaio pardon begins

Legal challenge to Arpaio pardon begins
By Jennifer Rubin August 30 at 9:35 AM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/right-turn/wp/2017/08/30/legal-challenge-to-arpaio-pardon-begins/?utm_term=.e6ac97728a97

After President Trump’s pardon of ex-sheriff Joe Arpaio, who had been convicted of criminal contempt for violating a court order designed to stop the violation of the constitutional rights of suspected illegal immigrants, conventional wisdom — and certainly the Trump administration — would have us believe that Trump’s pardon powers are unlimited. However, never before has someone stretched the pardon power so beyond its original intent. Trump has now drawn scrutiny not simply from critics of his racist rhetoric but from the court itself.

The Arizona Republic reports:

U.S. District Court Judge Susan Bolton canceled former Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s upcoming sentencing hearing for his criminal contempt-of-court conviction, telling attorneys not to file replies to motions that were pending before his recent presidential pardon.

However, Bolton on Tuesday stopped short of throwing out the conviction based solely on Arpaio’s request. Instead she ordered Arpaio and the U.S. Department of Justice, which is prosecuting the case, to file briefs on why she should or shouldn’t grant Arpaio’s request.

In other words, this is no slam dunk.

Meanwhile, Protect Democracy, an activist group seeking to thwart Trump’s violations of legal norms, and a group of lawyers have sent a letter to Raymond N. Hulser and John Dixon Keller of the Public Integrity Section, Criminal Division of the Justice Department, arguing that the pardon goes beyond constitutional limits. In their letter obtained by Right Turn, they argue:

While the Constitution’s pardon power is broad, it is not unlimited. Like all provisions of the original Constitution of 1787, it is limited by later-enacted amendments, starting with the Bill of Rights. For example, were a president to announce that he planned to pardon all white defendants convicted of a certain crime but not all black defendants, that would conflict with the Fourteenth Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause.

Similarly, issuance of a pardon that violates the Fifth Amendment’s Due Process Clause is also suspect. Under the Due Process Clause, no one in the United States (citizen or otherwise) may “be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.” But for due process and judicial review to function, courts must be able to restrain government officials. Due process requires that, when a government official is found by a court to be violating individuals’ constitutional rights, the court can issue effective relief (such as an injunction) ordering the official to cease this unconstitutional conduct. And for an injunction to be effective, there must be a penalty for violation of the injunction—principally, contempt of court.

Put simply, the argument is that the president cannot obviate the court’s powers to enforce its orders when the constitutional rights of others are at stake. “The president can’t use the pardon power to immunize lawless officials from consequences for violating people’s constitutional rights,” says one of the lawyers who authored the letter, Ron Fein, legal director of Free Speech for People. Clearly, there is a larger concern here that goes beyond Arpaio. “After repeatedly belittling and undermining judges verbally and on Twitter, now President Trump is escalating his attack on the courts into concrete actions,” says Ian Bassin, executive director of Protect Democracy. “His pardon and celebration of Joe Arpaio for ignoring a judicial order is a threat to our democracy and every citizen’s rights, and should not be allowed to stand.”

Those challenging the pardon understand there is no precedent for this — but neither is there a precedent for a pardon of this type. “While many pardons are controversial politically, we are unaware of any past example of a pardon to a public official for criminal contempt of court for violating a court order to stop a systemic practice of violating individuals’ constitutional rights,” Fein says. He posits the example of criminal contempt in the context of desegregation. “In 1962, after the governor and lieutenant governor of Mississippi disobeyed a court order to allow James Meredith to attend the University of Mississippi, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit ordered the Department of Justice to bring criminal contempt charges, which it then did,” Fein recalls. “Eventually, while the criminal contempt case was pending, the Mississippi officials relented and allowed Meredith (and others) to attend the university. But if the president had pardoned the Mississippi officials from the criminal contempt, it would have sent a clear message to other segregationist officials that court orders could be ignored.”

In other words, if the president can pardon anyone who defies court orders to enforce constitutional protections, then those constitutional protections are rendered meaningless. It is a creative argument, but then, this president has created new and disturbing challenges to democratic norms.

Lurking in the background is the potential for Trump to pardon associates involved in the probe of possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian officials and the possible obstruction of justice that followed. The Arpaio pardon may well have been an attempt to signal to those officials and ex-officials that they can resist inquiries with the assurance that Trump will pardon them. (Recall Trump’s unprecedented remarks that Michael Flynn should hold out for a grant of immunity.) Using the pardon power to obstruct an investigation into his own possible wrongdoing would signal a constitutional crisis. “It is possible that such an act would be of such corrupt intent and so contrary to our constitutional system that Congress would use it as a grounds to impeach, and/or that the special counsel would see it as a grounds to indict for violations of federal criminal statutes related to obstruction of justice,” Fein explains. Indeed, Congress can decide the president’s conduct is impeachable even in the absence of a finding of criminal wrongdoing. Fein warns, “As for the validity of these pardons, because Trump pardoning associates to shield them and him from scrutiny by the special counsel would be such a corrupt and untested act, his associates would be wise not to rely on such a pardon providing them full protection as, in the end, it might not.”

Other legal experts agree with this line of reasoning. Philip Allen Lacovara, a former U.S. deputy solicitor general in the Justice Department, who served as counsel to Watergate special prosecutors, argues in The Post today:

As with any other presidential power, the power to pardon is constrained by the ordinary requirements of federal law applicable to all public officials. For example, if representatives of a pardon-seeker arrived in the Oval Office with a bundle of cash that the president accepted in return for a pardon, there is little doubt that the president would be guilty of the crime of bribery. . . . If Trump were to pardon any of the figures in the current Russia investigation, his action would certainly impede or obstruct the due administration of justice, as the courts have broadly construed that standard.

It would not be difficult to imagine Mueller making the case that the motive behind such interference was “corrupt.” As the Founding Fathers made plain, the purpose behind the pardon power is to extend mercy to those who have offended and have demonstrated remorse. Using the pardon power to protect the president’s own interests against embarrassment or exposure is not legitimate. Rather, a crassly self-interested exercise of presidential power to impede the due administration of justice is the very antithesis of the president’s most solemn oath — “to take care that the laws be faithfully executed.”

And this brings us back to Judge Bolton. Bassin notes, “Judge Bolton may want to see how the honorable lawyers of DOJ’s public integrity section respond personally in open court — themselves as officers of the bar who’ve taken an oath to uphold the Constitution — to the blatant abuse of power by their boss.” He adds, “After all, these are people who’ve dedicated their lives and careers to ensuring our public officials act with integrity and Joe Arpaio and now the President of the United States have spit in the face of that.” Bolton’s hearing will venture into uncharted territory, a voyage necessitated by Trump’s utter disregard for the rule of law and his constitutional obligations to enforce the Constitution and laws of the United States.